Interesting Links: May 7, 2015

Here are links to some interesting news articles that I came across today. They are about two lies whites tell blacks and, sometimes, themselves believe.

A: Systemic racism in the USA is largely confined to the areas of the country where owning slaves was legal before 1865.

B: Black people can escape persecution by acting respectable and being engaged in respectable occupations.

Link 1: San Francisco Expands Racial Bias Inquiry Into Police

The text messages the officers exchanged discussed lynching African-Americans and proposing that African-Americans “should be spayed.” One text read “White Power.” Some referred to African-Americans using a racial slur. Other texts contained denigrating comments about gays, Mexicans and Filipinos, who make up a significant number of residents in one of the nation’s most culturally diverse cities.

In addition to the text messages, the task force is also investigating gladiator-style fights among San Francisco jail inmates that the city’s public defender, Jeff Adachi, has said were arranged by sheriff’s deputies. The jail guards, according to a report by Mr. Adachi, bet on the fights and threatened inmates with violence or withheld food if they did not take part. A third area being examined is the possibility that hundreds of convictions in criminal cases may have been compromised by analysts at the police laboratory who appear to have improperly handled DNA samples.

Link 2: Four black parole officers file civil suit against white police officers

Alexandre and his colleagues — Sheila Penister, Annette Thomas-Prince and Samuel Washington are all black New York State Parole officers. The parole officers have filed a civil lawsuit, alleging that they were racially profiled by the white officers and that their detainment was unnecessarily malicious and reckless. The parole officers contend that the Ramapo Police Department and the city “failed to adequately trains its police officers concerning the rights of citizens, in particular against racial bias/profiling and the use of force,” according to the lawsuit.

The parole officers state that they were all wearing their department-issued bullet proof vests with their gold badges displayed prominently around their necks. Additionally, they said their car had an official New York State placard displayed conspicuously on the dashboard, according to court documents. Alexandre and his colleagues were ordered to “raise their arms high in the air.” Alexandre stated he was “punched” by a police lieutenant and was “forced out of his vehicle despite having identified himself as a parole officer,” the documents state.

Link 3: Jersey Cops Let K9 Maul Man to Death, Then Try to Steal the Video

Policing in this country really seems to be going to the dogs. Yes, that’s a silly euphemism, at least unless you live in Vineland, New Jersey. A video filmed a week ago Tuesday appears to show local police allowing a K9 dog to tear into the face of what looks to be an unarmed black man while he is curled up on the ground. The man, identified as 32-year-old Phillip White, later died while in police custody.

This is the second death involving police in Cumberland County since last December, when Jeramie Reid was shot and killed by Bridgeton police during a traffic stop after officers allegedly saw a handgun. It was later revealed that Reid was suing the county for allegedly being assaulted by corrections officers while he was in the county jail.

Link 4: LAPD chief concerned about fatal shooting of unarmed man in Venice

Less than 16 hours after the deadly encounter, Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck stood before reporters and said he was “very concerned” about the shooting, which was recorded by a security camera. “Any time an unarmed person is shot by a Los Angeles police officer, it takes extraordinary circumstances to justify that,” Beck said. “I have not seen those extraordinary circumstances.”

Tim Pardue, who manages a homeless center on Windward Avenue, said Glenn stopped by the center Tuesday evening and admitted he had been drinking since 11 a.m. He left about 8 p.m., thanking Pardue for the noodles and crackers he had given him. At some point, he stopped to visit with other friends, including Bill Hinson, 37. Hinson said his friend told him he wanted to find some money to buy a beer, and took off for the boardwalk. About 11:30 p.m., gunshots broke out. Pardue said he walked out of the center and saw Glenn on the ground.

What do you think? Comments?

  1. shooting shadow
    May 8, 2015 at 9:33 am

    I think the situation with the police is reaching a point of no return. People, as Baltimore showed, aren’t going to take the abuse anymore especially not in areas where they are the majority. We are marching back towards legal segregation, and it will be necessary. Once the violent resistance starts really costing them money, you’ll see calls for segregation, just like in Israel. Baltimore and Ferguson may just be the beginning of the effects of an empire unraveling.

    • May 8, 2015 at 3:27 pm

      Aside from black men giving up access to multiple women of other ethnicities, it may be necessary, unfortunately.

      I’ll also add that blacks who believe that the problem will go away if they appear to be more “peaceful” or “respectable” are pathetic and it’s another way of cutting of one’s own nose to spite their face. The recent incident of four black parole officers being harassed is another great example. Generally, it’s all like living in an endless loop filled with inferiority complexes.

      Not just blacks, but people nationwide have been through too much drama with whites. If you were to eradicate or exterminate them, people probably would be at peace. I know it sounds fucked up, but the whole time, they are trying to exterminate everyone else.

      • P Ray
        April 15, 2016 at 11:44 pm

        The endless loop of inferiority complexes and “meritocracy” (in quote marks because it’s the bullshit meritocracy that’s peddled) is examined in this paper:
        http://www.uvm.edu/~vtconn/v31/Alvarado.pdf
        Dispelling the Meritocracy Myth

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