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Watching Most Female ‘Comedians’ Perform is About Virtue Signalling

November 21, 2018 16 comments

As readers might recall, a couple of years ago I wrote a post stating that most female comedians were not funny. To be clear, I did not say that they were all talentless or their male counterparts were more talented. I also said something about how those who promoted and patronized such female comics did so because of their worldview rather than because their actual talent or ability. And let us be honest about something else.. show-business is NOT a meritocracy, never has been and is unlikely to become one anytime in near future. Having said that, let us get to the topic of this post- namely, my contention that those who attend performances by the majority of female comics are doing so for reasons of virtue signalling rather than personal enjoyment.

My initial awareness of this phenomena was a byproduct of watching too much YouTube at night. While I usually view videos about topics that are of specific interest to me, occasionally I like to find out where the related video sidebar will take me. To make a long story short, while searching for clips of famous standup male comics, I also came across similar clips of supposedly famous female comics. It was then that I started to notice a peculiar difference in the type of audience reaction to male and female comics. While very competent male comics usually got a noticeably stronger positive audience reaction than their mediocre male counterparts, their response to female comics was oddly uniform.

To put it another way, really good female comics got almost the same reasonably good audience response as their mediocre counterparts. Some of you will say that humor is subjective, but it was pretty hard to ignore a persistent pattern of disconnect between the quality of comedy act and audience applause for female performers, but not for their male counterparts. Even more oddly, the type of audience reaction was also subtly different for female performers. Confused? Let me explain. You see.. audience members listening to male comics almost never react to any given joke at the same time or intensity- some audience members react before others and certain jokes elicit a far bigger reaction than others.

With female comics, the audience response is unusually constant and consistent. It is almost reminiscent of parents cheering on their kids at school performances and sporting events. The point I am trying to make is that a lot of the people who attend standup comedy acts headlined by women comics seem to be more interested in being there and cheering on the performer than enjoying the act. But why is that so? Here is a clue.. you also see similar behavior when a brain-damaged or dying kid is allowed to throw the first pitch at some baseball game. Almost nobody in the audience is really interested in watching it, but everybody is trying to project the image of being a good and compassionate person.

But having a limited patron base has its.. well.. limitations. Many of you might have noticed that the more recent NetFlix specials by Amy Schumer have not been especially successful, and to be quite blunt- nor have her films (especially when compared to the massive amount of free media hype and promotions she received). After the first season of ‘Broad City’ things haven’t really picked up for Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer- at least not in comedy. Tig Notaro and Margaret Cho now appear on TV more often to give their opinions on LGBT issues and male comedians who jerk of in front of unwilling women than for their comedic talent. Whitney Cummings and Chelsea Handler are now more well-known for their political positions than comedy. Chelsea Peretti is more famous for who she married and the career of her brother than her own.

Then again.. they all have financially benefited from their willingness to assist a certain section of the american population to demonstrate their moral and ideological superiority to those “other” people. In that respect, this behavior is no different from some people buying expensive art by some ‘famous’ artist or going to a restaurant owned by a ‘famous’ chef.

What do you think? Comments?