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Life Expectancy in USA has Always Been about Class: Dec 29, 2018

December 29, 2018 3 comments

About a year ago, I wrote a post which used public health data from CDC to show that differences in average life-expectancy between whites and blacks in USA were due to intentional public policy rather than any intrinsic genetic differences. In case you are wondering, I wrote the original post to expose the deliberate sophistry of so-called “public intellectuals” in USA who have long claimed that the differences in average life-expectancy between the two groups are based in “genetics” rather than intentional racist public policy. To quickly summarize it, the average life-expectancy for blacks in many affluent coastal states are higher than those of whites who live in poorer (and racist) southern states. In it, I also mentioned that the differences in life-expectancy by race in affluent and mostly coastal states was much smaller than those in the south or midwest.

Well.. it looks there is now a further piece of proof for this theory. According to the latest public-health statistics from Massachusetts, the average life-expectancy of black women and men now exceeds that of their white counterparts. And let us be clear about something else, Massachusetts is already at, or near the top, as far as average life-expectancy among states is concerned. Of course, there is not shortage of racist idiots and certain “public intellectuals” who will spend a lot of time trying to argue that blacks in that state are somehow “genetically different” from those in other states. As some of you might know, the average life-expectancy for blacks in UK (mostly Caribbean descent) crossed their income-matched white counterparts about two decades ago.

The statistics from Massachusetts does however show a very strong and unmistakable correlation between life expectancy and social class. In fact, it is far stronger than what you see in most european countries. Note that death rate for people from the lower social classes is many times higher than those from the upper classes. While part of the difference is due to deaths by Opioid overdose (itself a form of death by despair), it is clear that there are many other factors at work- from higher risk of alcoholism, accidents and delayed treatment of medical conditions. I cannot resist pointing out that for many decades, most whites in USA firmly believed that they would never end up in the same social class as blacks because they were somehow magically “superior” yada yada. Well.. turns out that was not the case- to put it mildly.

What do you think? Comments?